Academic Articles

Jonathan Waterlow received his PhD (DPhil) from the University of Oxford in 2012. He went on to hold a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship at St Antony’s College, Oxford, and was a Research Associate at the University of Bristol from 2016-18. He’s also been a Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto, and studied at the Universities of Edinburgh, St Andrews, and the Herzen State Pedagogical University in St Petersburg, Russia. He’s a founder at Voices in the Dark (voicesinthedark.world), where he writes and podcasts.

War Crimes Trials

 
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This chapter, co-authored with Donald Bloxham, surveys the controversial and contradictory evolution of the war crimes trials held during and after the Second World War. As well as exploring why and how trials took place at all (they were not common practice before the war), we intentionally highlighted the Soviet contributions to the trials, which have long been written off as insincere or unworthy of scholarly attention because ‘of course’ the Soviets only ever held ‘show trials’. But where’s the line between a ‘show trial’ and the Nuremberg Trials, which were likewise carefully controlled, the outcome essentially predetermined, and the defence disallowed from bringing up evidence which the court didn’t want to hear?

More information about the book can be found on the publisher’s website here.

 
Jamie Johnstone